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Benefits of Apple



Packing in quite a bit of soluble fiber (4 grams per medium apple) for a modest amount of calories (95) makes apples a filling, sweet snack. Plus, a medium apple counts as 1 cup of fruit, so after eating one you’re well on your way to meeting your daily fruit quota (around 2 cups for adults on a 2,000-calorie diet). Apple cider vinegar has long been used as a folk remedy, but it came to superstar prominence in the 1950s when D.C. Jarvis sang its praises in the best-selling book, "Folk Medicine: A Vermont Doctor's Guide to Good Health." Now it is revered as a health tonic with seemingly magical powers, rumored to have the properties needed to cure everything from warts to diabetes.


 
They also are a good source of immune-boosting vitamin C (providing 14% of the Daily Value).

            It's no surprise that apples are good for you—it's earned the "keep the doctor away" reputation, after all—but there are a number of lesser-known reasons to pick up a juicy one today:

Prevent indigestion

If you’re planning on indulging in a meal that you expect might not get along very well with your stomach, try drinking one teaspoon of apple cider vinegar mixed with one teaspoon of honey mixed in a small glass of warm water 30 minutes before you dine.

Apples lower cholesterol

One medium-sized apple contains about four grams of fiber. Some of that is in the form of pectin, a type of soluble fiber that has been linked to lower levels of LDL or "bad" cholesterol. That's because it blocks absorption of cholesterol,  which help the body to use it rather than store it.


Halt hiccups

If there was a clear-cut cure for the hiccups, we would all know about it and never suffer the spazzy things again. Alas, it’s eat peanut butter, hold your breath, drink water upside-down, be scared, and any number of other folksy remedies. But eventually, it seems like one of these sticks and does indeed seem to stop them in their tracks. So next time you have a round of uncontrollable hics, you might want to try the apple cider vinegar remedy (if you dare): A teaspoon straight down the hatch.

They keep you full

The wealth of fiber an apple provides keep you feeling full for longer without costing you a lot of calories—there are about 95 in a medium-sized piece of fruit. That's because it takes our bodies longer to digest complex fiber than more simple materials like sugar or refined grains. Anything with at least three grams of fiber is a good source of the nutrient; most people should aim to get about 25 to 40 grams a day.

They can help breathing problems

Five or more apples a week (less than an apple a day!) has been linked with better lung function, most likely because of an antioxidant called quercetin found in the skin of apples (as well as in onions and tomatoes), the BBC reports. The breath benefits of apples extend even further: A 2007 study found that women who eat plenty of the fruit are less likely to have children with asthma.



Brighten skin

Many who suffer the angst caused by skin problems — from psoriasis and eczema to dry skin and blemishes — praise apple cider vinegar for reducing inflammation and generally minimizing problems. Try dabbing it on affected areas with a cotton ball.

Lose weight

If there’s one promise that most supplements and superfoods love to claim, it’s their ability to aid in weight loss. For millennia vinegar has been used to help lose weight; whether to factual effect or not has yet to be proven by science, but many people cling to the practice with devotion. One small study in 2005 did find that people who ate a piece of bread with small amounts of vinegar felt fuller than those who didn’t have the vinegar. Yet when it comes to vinegar and weight loss.

Fight the itch

A dab of apple cider vinegar applied with a cotton ball is commonly recommended to make a pesky mosquito bite stop itching. It will sting a bit, but it will help quell the prickly tickle.



They decrease the risk of diabetes

A 2012 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that apples, as well as pears and blueberries, were linked with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes because of a class of antioxidants, anthocyanins, that are also responsible for red, purple, and blue colors in fruits and veggies.

They're good for your brain

The fruit has been linked to an uptick in acetylcholine production, which communicates between nerve cells, so apples may help your memory and lower your chances of developing Alzheimer's.

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